Leon Lederman, science education hacker, in 1997

Thursday, October 4, 2018
The death of Nobel Prize winner Leon Lederman took me back to 1997, when I interviewed the professor about his then- (and still-) revolutionary ideas on how to overhaul science education. Hear him talk about that—and much more—here



… or on iTunes or via your favorite podcast player.

And while you’re at it, check out my other interviews with thought-leaders through the years here and here.

(1988 photo: Energy.gov.)

Newspaper editorial boards: Cracking the code

Monday, September 17, 2018
How do you get the attention of newspaper editorial boards? How do you get them to see things your way? Are editorials as valuable as they used to be?

Every once in a while, the Publicity Club of Chicago takes me up on my motto, “Will Moderate for Food,” and invites me to lead a panel discussion to address important questions like those.

And so it was Sept. 12, 2018, as I joined three of the Chicago area’s most influential journalists—Chicago Tribune editorial board member Michael Lev, Sun-Times editorial page editor Tom McNamee and Daily Herald editor John Lampinen—for a session media critic Robert Feder called “thoughtful and enlightening.”

Hear the panel’s answers to those questions above—and much more—here



… or on iTunes or via your favorite podcast player.

And while you’re at it, check out my other interviews with thought-leaders through the years here and here. (L-r: Meyerson, Lev, Lampinen, McNamee.
Photo: Matt Smith.)

Help wanted: ABA and Happenstance

Saturday, August 25, 2018
As I do from time to time, I’m sharing a couple of opportunities for people with The Right Stuff.

My friends at the American Bar Association are seeking a director of digital content: “… a visionary content strategist for a unique opportunity to reinvent the digital user experience. … Build your own team of dynamic content creators and digital marketers that will reshape what it means to be a member of one of the world’s most important and prestigious professional associations at a crucial time for both the ABA and the profession.” Details and application here.

And the team at the emerging Chicago audio storytelling app Happenstance, which I serve as an informal (unpaid) adviser, is in the market for someone to help “on the marketing side (particularly social media, SEO, etc.) so we could have someone consistently dedicated to generating awareness and helping us build an audience for our soon-to-be-launching startup. Right now, we’re considering both freelance marketers and marketing agencies, specifically agencies that are familiar with startups and would fit our fun, quirky brand. Must have experience with Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Bonus points: LinkedIn and SnapChat.” Email hello@happenstanceapp.com.

Tell ’em Charlie sent ya. Or email me.

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Anna Quindlen, talking out loud in 1993

Saturday, May 5, 2018
Approaching Mother’s Day 1993, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Anna Quindlen—who shaped a generation’s approach to parenthood—stopped by the WNUA-FM studios in Chicago to promote her then-new book, Thinking Out Loud.

Check out this audio—recorded May 5, 1993—to learn why she objected to the name of a Chicago Tribune newspaper section.

Listen to my interview with Anna Quindlenon the web, iTunes or your favorite podcast player.



(Book jacket cover photo: Joyce Ravid,)